Post Tagged with: "U-boat"

A Picture Paints a Thousand Words – the New Tech Making our Exhibitions More Accessible

The Royal Commission is working with Danish app developers Vizgu to improve the experience of visually impaired visitors to its exhibitions.  The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales has worked with the Wales Council for the Blind, and Danish software company Vizgu, to create its first aud...

Pup rescue – All at sea, Lotte and the U 91

In spring of 1918, a German U-boat, U 91, commanded by Alfred von Glasenapp, was patrolling the Irish Sea. The U-boat had left port at Heligoland on 10 April 1918 and was having a prolific run. By 25 April, she had already sunk five vessels. On 26 April, the U-boat encountered the ETHEL, a wooden schooner, 19 miles off...

Special Remembrance Service for the Town of Dundalk to Commemorate Namesake Vessel

On Sunday 14 October, the town of Dundalk, County Louth, Ireland, commemorated the loss of a vessel whose crew were almost entirely drawn from the town – apart from two who had strong Welsh connections. One was Samuel J Cocks, the general manager of the shipping company that owned the vessel. A widower, he was return...

‘Deserved the Iron Cross’ – Tribute to Former captain of VANDALIA from German Submariners

The VANDALIA was torpedoed and sunk by German submarine U-96 on 9 June 1918 about 18 miles WNW of the Smalls. At the time, it was owned by the famous Cunard Steamship Co Ltd, Liverpool. The VANDALIA was one of 20 ships lost by the company through enemy action, including their flagship the LUISITANIA on 7 May 1915 with ...

100 years ago – the steam ship Boscastle was sunk on 7 April 1918 by U-111

SS Boscastle was built in West Hartlepool for E. Jenkins and Co., Cardiff. Her description at the launch in 1912 were as follows: “Length over all, 309ft.; breadth, 44ft. 9in.; and depth, 32ft. 1 in., with long bridge, poop, and top-gallant forecastle. The saloon, staterooms, captain’s, officers, and engineers...

The War at Sea: Christmas 1917

SS AGBERI: The silent herald The sinking of the SS AGBERI is an event that, at first glance, has not received much attention among scholars, the media, or the wider public. However, when placed in the wider context of the 1st World War, it is plain that the details surrounding her destruction show some of the most impo...

On this day one hundred ago, Holyhead’s Stanley Sailors’ Home provided the best welcome in Wales for a sunken steamship’s crew

The Stanley Sailors Home and Reading Room was built at the behest of W. O. Stanley and opened by the Bishop of Bangor in 1871 with accommodation for shipwrecked sailors. When the Elder Dempster steamship SS APAPA was torpedoed by U-96 on 28 November 1917, the survivors were welcomed by Commandant Jane Henrietta Adeane,...

#BHM – U-boats, Wales and West African Seamen

Photography by Iolanda Banu Viegas, Race Council Cymru.   After seeing our blog post for Black History Month last October which looked at the links between the U-boat War around the coast of Wales and West African seamen, Liz Millman, of Learning Links International, got in touch to ask us to present a talk at ...

New Imaging Techniques Capture Forgotten U-boat

On Christmas Day 1917, U-87 attacked a convoy in St George’s Channel (in particular, the 4812-ton British steamship AGBERI). One of the convoy escorts, P56, was just 150 yards away from the AGBERI when it was struck and turned to ram the submarine while another escort, the BUTTERCUP, fired and hit its conning tow...

100 years ago this month – submarine attacks in Welsh waters

On 1 February 1917 Germany declared a renewal of ‘unrestricted submarine warfare’ in a last ferocious attempt to force an end to the First World War. Almost immediately, major losses of merchant ships occurred in Welsh waters. Thirteen ships were sunk off Bardsey Island and the Pembrokeshire coast in that m...